chelle-the-zbornak-queen:

nowacking:

Good Guy Burglar

no you don’t understand.

he fully knew that he’d be arrested for breaking and entering but he still reported this.

he know he’d go to jail, but he put human decency before his own freedom and called out this disgusting sexual perversion.

and if you don’t think that’s the tightest thing ever get out of my face.

(Source: thedeathmerchant, via pezzacabello)

morethanonepage:

veganasana:

amoying:

maplesuhtori:

j0shdngr:

chill it’s cos your rare

the entire female population of east asia is rare?

homie ur about to be cooked medium rare and sacrificed

Omg

(Source: impastabowl, via fifth-harmony-is-my-drug)

17.Oct.14 3 days ago

taco-bell-rey:

when people who can’t sing never stop singing

image

(via redneck-url)

15.Oct.14 5 days ago

anrgy:

inspirational

(via please-be-mine-tonight)

,,

Children should remain silent, and they are ‘good’ when they’re quiet, but ‘bad’ when they are not, because they are disturbing the adults and causing trouble. This attitude runs through the way people interact with children on every level, and yet, they seem surprised when it turns out that children have been struggling with serious medical problems, or they’ve been assaulted or abused.

The most common response is ‘well why didn’t the child say something?’ or ‘why didn’t the child talk to an adult?’ Adults constantly assure themselves that children know to go to a grownup when they are in trouble, and they even repeat that sentiment to children; you can always come to us, adults tell children, when you need help. Find a trusted adult, a teacher or a doctor or a police officer or a firefighter, and tell that adult what’s going on, and you’ll be helped, and everything will be all right.

The thing is that children do that, and the adults don’t listen. Every time a child tells an adult about something and nothing happens, that child learns that adults are liars, and that they don’t provide the promised help. Children hold up their end of the deal by reporting, sometimes at great personal risk, and they get no concrete action in return. Sometimes, the very adult people tell a child to ‘trust’ is the least reliable person; the teacher is friends with the priest who is molesting a student, the firefighter plays pool with the father who is beating a child, they don’t want to cause a scene.

Or children are accused of lying for attention because they accused the wrong person. They’re told they must be mistaken about what happened, unclear on the specifics, because there’s no way what they’re saying could be true, so and so isn’t that kind of person. A mother would never do that. He’s a respected member of the community! In their haste to close their ears to the child’s voice, adults make sure the child’s experience is utterly denied and debunked. Couldn’t be, can’t be, won’t be. The child knows not to say such things in the future, because no one is listening, because people will actively tell the child to be quiet.

Children are also told that they aren’t experiencing what they’re actually experiencing, or they’re being fussy about nothing. A child reports a pain in her leg after gym class, and she’s told to quit whining. Four months later, everyone is shocked when her metastatic bone cancer becomes unavoidably apparent. Had someone listened to her in the first place when she reported the original bone pain and said it felt different that usual, she would have been evaluated sooner. A child tells a teacher he has trouble seeing the blackboard, and the teacher dismisses it, so the child is never referred for glasses; the child struggles with math until high school, when someone finally acknowledges there’s a problem.

This attitude, that children shouldn’t be believed, puts the burden of proof on children, rather than assuming that there might be something to their statements. Some people seem to think that actually listening to children would result in a generation of hopelessly spoiled brats who know they can say anything for attention, but would that actually be the case? That assumption is rooted in the idea that children are not trustworthy, and cannot be respected. I’m having trouble understanding why adults should be viewed as inherently trustworthy and respectable, especially in light of the way we treat children.

14.Oct.14 6 days ago

mslaurenjauregui:

harmaleizer:

image

INNER THOUGHTS

BRINGING THIS BACK BC IS FUCKING HILARIOUS 

(via jauregaybows)

14.Oct.14 6 days ago

infinitystops:

HOLY FUCK

(Source: safewordstealy, via wwaakeme-up)

postracialcomments:

cousinnick:

latenightalaska:

davereziplease:

dietchola:

JESUS CHRIST

“I’m a horrible father”

THE BEST PART IS THE GIRL IN THE MIDDLE JUST SO DONE

AND THE FACT THAT THIS FAMILY IS MORE MULTI CULTURAL THAN A PUBLIC SCHOOL HEALTH CLASS TEXTBOOK

The girl in the middle is just like “Damn it, Dad.”

awwww omg!

(Source: youtube.com, via nicnuggets)

13.Oct.14 1 week ago

pettydavis:

neptunain:

FUCK GHOSTS MAN

STOP FUCKIN WIT OUIJA BOARDS. YALL AINT LEARNED YET??

(via awkwardvagina)

homestuckorbust:

helianthi:

What did the pirate say when he turned 80

Aye matey

GO TO HELL THAT WAS CLEVER

(Source: poisonightshade, via teamlockwood)

13.Oct.14 1 week ago